Toronto, Victoria consider mental-health workers to replace law enforcement in civilian-led model for crises response

Combination of handout photos of Canadians who were killed during police interactions during a mental health crisis, clockwise from top left: Rodney Levi, D’Andre Campbell, Caleb Tubila Njoko, Regis Korchinski-Paquet and Chantel Moore.

Handout

On the evening of May 5, Nelly Wendo called police in London, Ont., to ask for help. Her son, 27-year-old Caleb Tubila Njoko, was “acting crazy” and needed a “mental-health doctor,” she said.

The police operator asked if her son was kicking, punching or acting violently toward her.

“No,” she said, according to a report released in September by the Special Investigations Unit (SIU), Ontario’s police watchdog.. She was scared, but only because he was speaking gibberish and refusing to sleep. She reiterated that she needed mental-health responders.

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As police forces across the country face intense scrutiny over a series of deaths that have focused attention on issues of race and mental

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Military-Style Response at One Retirement Community Stymies COVID-19

Along with much of the country, Knollwood Life Plan Community in the District of Columbia went into lockdown in mid-March to try to protect residents and staff from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The retirement community includes sections for independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing. The leadership team stopped allowing visitors to the facility, which is typically home to 280 people – all of whom are retired military service members, former high-level federal government officials and family members. Residents range from those living independently to those needing a high level of care. They are served by 250 staffers, who all began wearing personal protective equipment, including masks, disposable gloves and full gowns, when the pandemic began.

The first weeks of lockdown seemed fine.

Everything changed six days before Easter, on April 6. That day, the District of Columbia Medical Examiner’s office called to notify community

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‘Mr. Vice President, I’m speaking’: Women praise Kamala Harris’s response to Mike Pence’s debate interruptions

Minutes into the first and only vice presidential debate on Wednesday night, as Senator Kamala Harris described her view of the Trump administration’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Vice President Mike Pence and debate moderator Susan Page began to interject.

“Mr. Vice President, I’m speaking. I’m speaking,” Harris turned to Pence and said.

Harris repeated the refrain later in the debate, while rebutting Pence’s claim that Joe Biden would try to raise taxes on Americans in response to a question on the economy posed by Page.

According to NBC News, which tracked the number of interruptions by each candidate during the debate, Pence interrupted Harris almost twice as many times as she interrupted him.

The phrase began trending on Twitter, with Harris’s use of the line sparking support from women who appeared to empathize with being interrupted by men at work.

It even played out during CNN’s post-debate broadcast, when,

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Women cheer on Harris’s ‘I’m speaking’ response in debate: ‘I hope every little girl heard that’

Women on social media cheered on Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisOvernight Defense: Top military officers quarantine after positive COVID case | Distracted pilot, tech issues led to F-35 crash It matters: Kamala Harris and the VP debate CDC director says it’s safe for Pence to take part in debate MORE (D-Calif.) over a viral exchange with Vice President Pence during their vice presidential debate Wednesday night.

Harris twice interjected “I’m speaking,” when interrupted by Pence, with clips of the moments being widely shared online and appearing to resonate with many of the women who were watching.

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WHO Faults U.S. Virus Response; Women Leaving Jobs: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — A top World Health Organization official said the outbreak at the White House constituted a “cluster,” suggesting that the U.S. had yet to “get this disease under control.” Stimulus talks are in limbo amid President Donald Trump’s positive virus test result.

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Democratic nominee Joe Biden tested negative for the virus, as did several senior administration officials including Vice President Mike Pence. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who suffered a serious case last spring, sent best wishes as his nation continues to struggle with a severe second wave.

Women, especially those in the age group most likely to have young children, are dropping out of the job market at the fastest pace since the height of the pandemic.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases pass 34.3 million; deaths exceed 1.02 millionTrump’s age and weight make Covid particularly dangerousTrump infection puts large retinue of White House aides at risk

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NOC and SOC together: DHS moves to new model for operations, incident response

Written by

Dave Nyczepir

The Department of Homeland Security is consolidating its network and security operations centers to ensure services remain available when analysts must investigate a cybersecurity incident, according to the department’s new chief information officer.

The resulting network operations security center (NOSC) model represents a shift from traditional cyber incident response, where the SOC’s goal typically is to take the system offline until the problem can be identified and fixed.

“It’s not just consolidation for consolidation’s sake,” CIO Karen Evans said during an ACT-IAC event Wednesday. “It’s the next evolution of providing and managing risk to keep the business going while we are then analyzing, being aware of and being able to protect our operations.”

Evans said she held planning sessions internally, as well as with the department’s CIO Council. The department is currently considering how best to staff the NOSC in terms

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Technical Education Leader’s Response To Pandemic And New Blended Training Model Lead To Employment For Graduates

PHOENIX, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — As the pandemic continues to deliver a colossal shock to the economy, with weekly unemployment claims increasing to 870,000 for the week ending September 19 and topping an unprecedented 700,000 each week for over six months, Universal Technical Institute‘s (NYSE: UTI) pandemic response plan and blended training model are delivering results, with graduates finding employment across the nation.

“In a time of extraordinary challenges, our students are completing their education and going to work,” said Jerome A. Grant, Chief Executive Officer. “The fact that there are good jobs waiting for our graduates speaks to industry’s urgent demand for skilled technicians and the quality of our industry-aligned education model.”

The U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimated pre-pandemic there will be more than 110,000 job openings for automotive, diesel and collision repair technicians on average annually across the U.S.

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