Korean group must remove Berlin tribute to “comfort women”

BERLIN (AP) — A Berlin district has ordered a local Korean group to remove a statue commemorating women used as sex slaves by Japan during World War II, saying Friday it goes beyond what had been approved.

The issue of sex slaves, euphemistically called “comfort women,” has been a major source of friction between South Korea and Japan, and the district’s decision came after Japan expressed irritation about the statue depicting a woman sitting next to an empty chair.

Stephan von Dassel, mayor of the central Mitte district, said permission had been given for the Korean organization to display a “peace statue” for one year, as a broad “statement against sexualized violence against women in armed conflicts.”

Instead, he said, the statue unveiled in late September “exclusively addresses the behavior of the Japanese army in World War II.”

“This has led to irritation in Japan on a national and local

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The best ways to remove stains from kids’ clothing | 3 On Your Side

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) — Back to school might look a little different this year. But some things never change, like the  exceptional ability of kids to stain their clothing, whether it’s grass, gum, or more artistic stains like crayon or Play-Doh. The experts at Consumer Reports have some helpful tips on removing stains.

If the stain is still fresh, water alone may actually remove it. But if the stain has set in, a few household items and a good detergent to pretreat it can help.

For crayon—fresh or melted—remove as much as possible. Then work a small amount of dish detergent into the stain. Let it sit for a few minutes, then rub the fabric under warm water. Afterward, wash the clothing in the hottest water temperature allowed for the specific fabric.

Use regular laundry detergent and an oxygenated bleach like OxiClean. Let the clothing air-dry and repeat if the

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Google has done well to remove beauty filter from its phones, but it can’t really police its app store for this



a close up of a device: Google’s move is to be lauded, but as long as beauty filters continue to be available on the Android Playstore as also other app stores, it likely won’t mean much.


© Provided by The Financial Express
Google’s move is to be lauded, but as long as beauty filters continue to be available on the Android Playstore as also other app stores, it likely won’t mean much.

Last week, Google announced that it would no longer include beauty filters in its phones’ camera app. Social and traditional media have helped popularise a rather constricted view on physical beauty; now, phones have also included such features to allow users to tweak their photos to conform to these standards of appearance.

Scientists see this as a factor behind poor mental health and appearance-related dysphoria, especially among teenagers and young adults. Google’s move is to be lauded, but as long as beauty filters continue to be available on the Android Playstore as also other app stores, it likely won’t mean much.

Also, limiting filters and similar apps will address just part of the problem.

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