Why Republican women face a bleaker picture in the battle for representation in Congress

Congress welcomed a record number of women in 2018 — 102 in the House and 25 in the Senate, with the 116th class becoming the most diverse group of lawmakers in U.S. history. But the new high could only be attributed to successes in the Democratic Party, including a number of historic firsts for Democratic women of color.

For Republican women, the outcome was dismal. The GOP entered 2019 with eight female senators — an improvement, but far short of the 17 on the Democratic side. And in the House, out of 197 Republicans, a mere 13 were women, compared to 23 during the last cycle.

PHOTO: Female lawmakers cheer during President Trump's State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives in the Capitol, Feb. 5, 2019.

Female lawmakers cheer during President Trump’s State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives in the Capitol, Feb. 5, 2019.

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A record number of women of color are running for Congress

A Black woman on a presidential ticket is unprecedented. But Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) isn’t the only one making history this election season. 

All down the ballot, women, especially women of color, are running for office in unprecedented numbers — breaking records set just two years ago. 

“This year’s numbers are a positive sign that 2018 wasn’t necessarily an anomaly,” Kelly Dittmar, director of research at the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), told the Guardian. “What this year also points to positively is a continued diversification of the women who are running for office and who are getting nominations.”  


WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT CORONAVIRUS RIGHT NOW

ALL-GIRL TEEN CODING TEAM DEVELOPS APP THAT RATES RESTAURANTS ON COVID-19 SAFETY

HALF OF US HOUSEHOLDS IN THE FOUR LARGEST CITIES STRUGGLE TO PAY BILLS AMID PANDEMIC

NYPD CREATES TASK FORCE TO INVESTIGATE ATTACKS ON ASIAN AMERICANS

EQUAL PAY

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What women in Congress say about Amy Coney Barrett



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Dynacure to Present Disease Progression Model and Natural History Study Data at the 25th Annual Congress of the World Muscle Society (WMS25)

STRASBOURG, Pa. and PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Dynacure, a clinical stage drug development company focused on improving the lives of patients with rare and orphan disorders, announced today that the company will present two posters containing data on the natural history of Myotubular and Centronuclear Myopathies (CNM) at the 25th Annual Congress of the World Muscle Society (WMS25). The WMS25 meeting is being held in a virtual format.

Dynacure is developing DYN101, an investigational antisense medicine designed to modulate the expression of dynamin 2 (DNM2), for the treatment of CNM. DYN101 is currently being evaluated in a Phase 1/2 clinical study, ‘UNITE-CNM’ (DYN101-C101), at multiple clinical sites in Europe.

Details of the poster presentations are listed below:

Poster Abstract: # LSP (late submitted poster) 6
Title: Hierarchical Bayesian model of disease progression in centronuclear myopathy allows to demonstrate treatment efficacy with a small sample size
Date: Thursday, October

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Congress Just Passed Two Bills That Are Intended to Protect Native Women from Violence

Photo credit: Sarah Morris - Getty Images
Photo credit: Sarah Morris – Getty Images

From Harper’s BAZAAR

Last week, Congress passed the Not Invisible Act and Savanna’s Act, two bills aiming to address the epidemic of violence against Native women, commonly referred to as missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Statistics show that Native American women are particularly vulnerable to violence in their lifetimes. On some reservations, for instance, Native women are murdered at a rate more than 10 times the national average. And across the board, more than four in five American Indian and Alaska Native women have experienced violence in their lifetimes, whether it be sexual violence or physical violence at the hands of a partner, according to a 2016 study funded by the National Institute of Justice. Also, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists homicide as the third leading cause of death for Native women 19 years old and under.

Savanna’s Act—named for

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