Will Amazon’s “Climate Pledge Friendly” Label Transform Online Shopping?

Amazon recently announced a new climate initiative which allows customers to “see the Climate Pledge Friendly label when searching for more than 25,000 products to signify that the products have one or more of 19 different sustainability certifications that help preserve the natural world, such as reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers.”

We were pleased to learn of this announcement because we had called for a third-party certified climate label from Amazon about a year ago in Forbes.com.  But for the label to become a gamer changer, Amazon needs to make the climate-friendly option visible on its website.

Three Prongs of Decarbonization

How does Amazon’s new initiative fit the big picture on climate action? Think of three pillars

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The Washington Post’s Climate Quiz is a great way to test your knowledge

All right: Time to see if you’ve been paying attention to The Washington Post coverage of the people, organizations and governments trying to mitigate climate change, found on our Climate Solutions page. If you have, this quiz should be an easy A.

1. Which major oil and gas company says it will either eliminate or offset its carbon emissions to a net zero level by 2050?

Answer: C. Under a new CEO, BP has pledged that it will invest heavily in renewable energy and, through a combination of buying carbon offsets and scaling back the amount of gas and oil it produces, will be carbon neutral by 2050.

2. There’s an unusual material showing up in fashion design houses that could help solve the problem of textile waste in landfills. What is it?

Answer: C. Increasingly, scientists are using mycelium, the threadlike vegetative roots of fungus, to create everything

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Simulation model may reduce the climate footprint of oil production

Simulation model may reduce the climate footprint of oil production
The maximum distance permitted for the transportation of oil and gas in the same subsea pipeline will probably soon be increased thanks to a recently developed simulation tool developed jointly by SINTEF and the Norwegian company LedaFlow Technologies. Credit: LedaFlow Technologies

Future offshore oil and gas fields are most likely to be “satellite developments” that are less expensive and emit less greenhouse gasses than other fields because they do not require new production platforms. An innovative Norwegian computational tool called “Slug Capturing 2” is now enabling the design of longer pipelines that will allow many more fields to be developed as satellites.


Out of sight from land and from the air, the Norwegian shelf is covered by a spider’s web of pipelines through which production fluids flow from the wells tapping the reservoirs.

This system carrying oil, water and gas in the same pipeline is called multiphase transport.

Research scientists

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