Lakeland director’s film encourages girls and women to pursue aviation careers

Lakeland filmmaker Katie McEntire Wiatt made her directorial debut with her documentary “Fly Like a Girl” in 2019 when the film hit the festival circuit, including the Sarasota Film Festival. Now, it has been acquired by Gravitas Ventures and will be available for wide release on-demand and in select theaters starting Oct. 9.

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The documentary is about females in aviation, from pilots to an airport operations manager, professionals in the aerospace industry and young women aspiring to be astronauts, like Taylor Richardson.

A few of the women featured include retired NASA astronaut Nicole Stott; Vernice “FlyGirl” Armour, recognized by the Department of Defense as the United State’s first African-American female combat pilot; and Shaesta Waiz, who made history by becoming the youngest woman to fly solo around the world in a single-engine aircraft and as the first female certified civilian pilot from Afghanistan.

The interview subjects tell their

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Why being ‘too grateful’ at work can impact women’s careers

Being overly grateful at work can deny us our power — particularly for women. Photo: Getty
Being overly grateful at work can deny us our power — particularly for women. Photo: Getty

You’ve worked hard to land a good job, you’ve got a decent boss and your colleagues are easy to get along with. Your salary isn’t amazing, but it’s enough to pay your rent and bills. You feel grateful that you’re employed at all, particularly when so many people are facing redundancy as a result of COVID-19.

Being thankful is rarely a negative thing. In recent years, research into positive psychology has consistently linked gratitude with greater happiness. And at work, feeling grateful can have a number of positive outcomes, including lower stress levels, more positive emotions and higher job satisfaction.

We’re often reminded to express gratitude and to appreciate the good in situations. But in some cases, gratitude can be taken too far. When we find ourselves overly thankful, it can deny us our

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A quarter of women are considering scaling back careers, report finds

A quarter of women are considering leaving the workforce or scaling back on their career aspirations because of the extra demands created by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the annual study of women in the workplace released Sept. 30 by McKinsey & Company and LeanIn.org.

Working mothers are three times as likely as working fathers to be handling a majority of housework, and the disparity is particularly onerous for Black women, according to the Women in the Workplace report, which surveyed more than 40,000 employees at 317 companies. The study also found that senior-level women are more likely than male peers to feel burned out, in part because they are often among few women at their level — and they are more likely than younger workers to be parenting.

“If we had a panic button, we’d be hitting it,” Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook and co-founder of LeanIn.org,

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Facing dual challenges of work and home-schooling, more women are sacrificing their careers

As virtual schooling ramps up in some areas, women are being forced to make the choice between caring for their children or prioritizing their own career. This sets up a huge and largely overlooked threat that hangs over women’s participation in the workforce and their recovery from the job losses in the recession.

“So many schools are opening with distance learning, it certainly is a new set of obligations on parents to help their kids move through the day, and we know that women tend to bear the lion’s share of that childcare distance learning work,” said Emily Martin, vice president of education and workplace justice at the National Women’s Law Center.

“As a mom, and I think a lot of women feel this way, we kind of just take it on,” said Gabriela Bradt, a marine biologist and mother of three kids between the ages of four and 11,

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We Must Protect The Careers Of Working Women During COVID-19

Earlier this year, nearly two months to the day before the declaration of a national emergency due to COVID-19, women in the U.S. held more jobs than men for the first time since 2010. The milestone lead a Moody’s economist to declare in Forbes that “Women are now the majority of the workforce, and there’s no looking back.” Sadly, nine months and an unprecedented global pandemic later, not only has that momentum been lost, but unemployment rates for women have outpaced that of men throughout the crisis. Though the reasons for this disparity are varied, they are nevertheless unacceptable, both for the millions of women whose careers face an uncertain future, and for the global economy, which could lose $1 trillion in the next 10 years if this gender disparity is not addressed.

The reasons the pandemic has impacted female workers more than men is multi-faceted. In the early stages

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Coronavirus pandemic could be throttling women’s careers

The coronavirus pandemic could wipe out at least six years’ worth of progress for women in the workplace, according to a sobering new report from McKinsey and women’s advocacy nonprofit Lean In. 



a person sitting at a table using a laptop computer: The pandemic is affecting women in the workplace. Getty Images


© Provided by CNET
The pandemic is affecting women in the workplace. Getty Images

“We are sounding the alarm, we are worried, we are at a crossroads,” said Lareina Yee, senior partner and chief diversity and inclusion officer at McKinsey during a virtual press conference on Wednesday.

For the last six years, the Women in the Workplace report has collected data about how women progress — or don’t — through their careers. This year, the report, based on 317 companies across the US and Canada, surveyed more than 40,000 employees in a range of industries from finance to tech. It checked in with how the pandemic is affecting women, many of whom are juggling their work lives with

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1 in 4 women are thinking about altering their careers due to Covid-19

The coronavirus crisis is continuing to impact the way we all live and work, but new data from Lean In and McKinsey & Company shows that women are being disproportionately affected by today’s pandemic. 

In its newly released “Women in the Workplace” report, Lean In and McKinsey & Company found that one in four women are considering downshifting their careers or leaving the workforce due to the impact of Covid-19. 

“This is the most alarming report we’ve ever seen,” Facebook’s chief operating officer and Lean In founder Sheryl Sandberg tells CNBC Make It. “I think what’s happening is this report confirms what people have suspected, but we haven’t really had the data, which is that the coronavirus is hitting women incredibly hard and really risks undoing the progress we’ve made for women in the workforce.”

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook speaks onstage during ‘Putting a Best Facebook Forward’ at Vanity

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A Quarter of Women Are Considering Scaling Back Careers

(Bloomberg) — A quarter of women are considering leaving the workforce or scaling back on their career aspirations because of the extra demands created by the Covid-19 pandemic, according to the annual study of women in the workplace released Wednesday by McKinsey & Company and LeanIn.Org.

Working mothers are three times as likely as working fathers to be handling a majority of housework, and the disparity is particularly onerous for Black women, according to the Women in the Workplace report, which surveyed more than 40,000 employees at 317 companies. The study also found that senior-level women are more likely than male peers to feel burned out, in part because they are often among few women at their level and they are more likely than younger workers to be parenting.



Sheryl Sandberg in a blue shirt


© Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg
Sheryl Sandberg

“If we had a panic button, we’d be hitting it,” Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer

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Largest Study of Women in Corporate America Finds 1 in 4 Women Are Considering Leaving the Workforce or Downshifting Their Careers Due to Covid-19

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, McKinsey & Company and LeanIn.Org released the annual Women in the Workplace report, the largest study of its kind. After six years of slow but measurable progress in the representation of women in corporate America, 1 in 4 women are now considering leaving the workforce or downshifting their careers due to Covid-19. In a single year, this would wipe out all of the hard-earned gains we’ve seen for women in management—and unwind years of progress toward gender diversity.

The report is based on data and insights from 317 companies employing more than 12 million people, along with survey responses from more than 40,000 individual employees. It urges companies to act immediately to avert this potential crisis and includes recommendations for addressing the feelings of burnout and being “always on” for work that many employees are grappling with right now.

“If we had

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1 in 4 women considering leaving workforce or downshifting careers because of COVID-19, report warns

The coronavirus pandemic has the potential to undo years of gains for women in the workplace, according to a massive new study on the state of women in corporate America released on Wednesday.

At least one in four women are considering downshifting their careers or leaving the workforce because of COVID-19, according to the annual Women in the Workplace study from LeanIn.org and consulting firm McKinsey & Company. The study involved 317 companies representing over 12 million employees.

This marks the first time in six years of the annual report that the researchers found evidence of women intending to leave their jobs at higher rates than men. Researchers also warned this exodus could possibly undo all the gains women have made in management and senior leadership roles over those past six years.

“The report is really showing the true scale of the problem of what COVID-19 is doing to women,”

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