Breast cancer survivor urges women to get regular screenings and mammograms, thanks local non-profit ‘The Rose’

The first time Ediana Quijada found a lump in her breast, she was laughed off and told “it was happening because of her period and nothing to worry about.”

It was far from nothing. After a six-year battle with metastatic breast cancer, the cheerful Houston native is happy to share her story with other young women, advising regular breast exams, early detection having made a key difference in many cases.

In the fall of 2012, 29-year-old Ediana was finishing her construction management internship at the University of Houston.

The internship did not offer health insurance but UH hosts free mammography screenings in October in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month. However, when she told the nurses about her lump, they assured her, with a cursory glance, that she was too young to worry about cancer. She was sent away without a mammogram.

Reassured and a little abashed about being paranoid,

Read More

3D structural model of BAF complex modifies DNA architecture, provides clues on cancer

Scientists have created an unprecedented 3-dimensional structural model of a key molecular “machine” known as the BAF complex, which modifies DNA architecture and is frequently mutated in cancer and some other diseases.

The researchers, led by Cigall Kadoch, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have reported the first 3-D structural “picture” of BAF complexes purified directly from human cells in their native states – rather than artificially synthesized in the laboratory -providing an opportunity to spatially map thousands of cancer-associated mutations to specific locations within the complex.

“A 3-D structural model, or ‘picture,’ of how this complex actually looks inside the nucleus of our cells has remained elusive – until now,” says Kadoch. The newly obtained model represents “the most complete picture of the human BAF complex achieved to date,” said the investigators, reporting in the journal Cell.

These new findings “provide

Read More

Black Women Battling Breast Cancer Deserve More Wig Options, According to Coils to Locs Founder Dianne Austin

Courtesy

When Dianne Austin decided to ditch her relaxer and transition back to her natural hair in 2011, she had no idea that four years later she would be hit with the heartbreaking news of a breast cancer diagnosis.

“My first thoughts were how ironic it was that I went down this path of embracing my natural hair just to lose every strand of it,” she shares with InStyle. “It was a huge decision for me to stop relaxing my hair and to begin to embrace my natural texture after years of relaxing.”

As she began to say goodbye to her own hair, Austin, like many in cancer treatment, was in search of a wig. And while they’re sometimes covered, depending on the healthcare insurance provider, she wasn’t able to find any that even came close to matching her natural coily texture.

That’s why in 2019, she created Coils to

Read More

New 3-D model of a DNA-regulating complex in human cells provides cancer clues — ScienceDaily

Scientists have created an unprecedented 3-dimensional structural model of a key molecular “machine” known as the BAF complex, which modifies DNA architecture and is frequently mutated in cancer and some other diseases. The researchers, led by Cigall Kadoch, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have reported the first 3-D structural “picture” of BAF complexes purified directly from human cells in their native states — rather than artificially synthesized in the laboratory -providing an opportunity to spatially map thousands of cancer-associated mutations to specific locations within the complex.

“A 3-D structural model, or ‘picture,’ of how this complex actually looks inside the nucleus of our cells has remained elusive — until now,” says Kadoch. The newly obtained model represents “the most complete picture of the human BAF complex achieved to date,” said the investigators, reporting in the journal Cell.

These new findings “provide a critical foundation for understanding human disease-associated mutations

Read More

Mary J. Blige on barriers Black women face in breast cancer awareness

Nine-time Grammy winner Mary J. Blige is using her powerful voice to bring attention to the barriers Black women face when it comes to breast cancer screenings — according to the CDC, breast cancer has a 40% higher mortality rate among Black women than White women.. 

Teaming up with the Black Women’s Health Imperative, Blige took part in a PSA where she recounted her own personal experience with breast cancer in an effort to try and inspire Black women to be proactive when it comes to their health.

“I lost my aunt to breast cancer. And that has crossed my mind a bit when I’ve gone in for my annual appointments,” she says in the video. “However, I haven’t let that stop me from being sure about my health and I don’t think anyone else should either. Black women are often very private. We don’t want people knowing our business.

Read More

Grand Party Hotel viewers left in tears as bride dies from terminal cancer just two months after her wedding

GRAND Party Hotel viewers were left in tears as a bride died just two months after her wedding.

After an emotional episode, a tribute appeared on screen dedicated to one of the hotel’s guests Kaylea who tragically died just a few short weeks after her wedding at the hotel was filmed.

Kaylea died of terminal cancer just weeks after she married the love of her life

7

Kaylea died of terminal cancer just weeks after she married the love of her lifeCredit: BBC

The BBC One show that takes viewers behind the scenes of Liverpool’s Shankly Hotel and shares the poignant stories of the guests, paid tribute to Mark and Kaylea who tied the knot during the show.

The couple, who had been together for 14 years, made the heartbreaking decision to bring their wedding forward after Kaylea was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

During the moving episode Kaylea said she had been through “hell on earth” as doctors told her there was nothing more

Read More

Why Black women face disproportionate rates of breast cancer

This story originally ran on Today.com.

The day before she turned 30 and had planned to leave for a celebratory vacation, Sharonda Vincent felt a lump on her left breast while in the shower. She scheduled a last-minute appointment with a doctor at Planned Parenthood, who told her to enjoy her trip because she doubted it was cancerous.

After Vincent returned home to Philadelphia, the mother of one decided to see her primary care provider, just in case. This led to a series of tests, including a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy. In the summer of 2005, she was diagnosed with stage 2B breast cancer.

“I was numb, hurt, confused, upset, questioning God,” she told TODAY. “It was a complete shock.”

Vincent, now 45, has been cancer-free for 15 years, thanks to the surgery, chemo and radiation she underwent that summer. She’s among the millions of Black women who’ve survived breast

Read More

Why Black women face high rates of breast cancer

This story originally ran on Today.com.

The day before she turned 30 and had planned to leave for a celebratory vacation, Sharonda Vincent felt a lump on her left breast while in the shower. She scheduled a last-minute appointment with a doctor at Planned Parenthood, who told her to enjoy her trip because she doubted it was cancerous.

After Vincent returned home to Philadelphia, the mother of one decided to see her primary care provider, just in case. This led to a series of tests, including a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy. In the summer of 2005, she was diagnosed with stage 2B breast cancer.

“I was numb, hurt, confused, upset, questioning God,” she told TODAY. “It was a complete shock.”

Vincent, now 45, has been cancer-free for 15 years, thanks to the surgery, chemo and radiation she underwent that summer. She’s among the millions of Black women who’ve survived breast

Read More

RI Girl Battling Cancer Gets Magical Gift From Photographer

PROVIDENCE, RI (CBS) – Five-year-old Arianna Taft loves Disney princesses. When a local photographer heard about her brave fight with cancer, she gave her the dress up play date of her dreams. And even bought the costumes.

“It’s incredible that something that takes such a small amount of time out of my day, or my week, can have such a powerful impact,” said Ashley Richer. “It gives them their own sense of hope cause they’re so small and they can believe in magic a little bit more.”





© Provided by CBS Boston


Arianna Taft (Photo credit Ashley Richer Photography)

For Richer it’s important to create magical moments for children. A few years ago, one of her son’s best friends passed away from a terminal illness. Richer honors her spirit by helping kids like Arianna live out a fairytale photoshoots.

Arianna was diagnosed with an advanced form kidney cancer back in

Read More

Houston nonprofit The Rose determined to help uninsured women receive breast cancer treatment

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted millions of lives in many ways, one of which is the severe cut back in the number people keeping up with their routine checkups. Houston-based nonprofit group The Rose, which has been helping women receive breast cancer diagnoses and treatments for over 35 years regardless of their ability to pay, is determined not to give up on its mission.

Dorothy Gibbons, CEO and co-founder of The Rose, said the marked increase in the number of people putting off their mammograms was disastrous since early detection was the key to stopping cancer in most cases.

“We are conducting our screenings while observing social distancing,” said Gibbons. “We’re at 75 percent of what we normally would be doing. Some of our ladies are having to wait a bit to get their mammogram.”

The Rose operates two clinics in Houston and Bellaire respectively where women, insured or uninsured,

Read More