Breast cancer survivor urges women to get regular screenings and mammograms, thanks local non-profit ‘The Rose’

The first time Ediana Quijada found a lump in her breast, she was laughed off and told “it was happening because of her period and nothing to worry about.”

It was far from nothing. After a six-year battle with metastatic breast cancer, the cheerful Houston native is happy to share her story with other young women, advising regular breast exams, early detection having made a key difference in many cases.

In the fall of 2012, 29-year-old Ediana was finishing her construction management internship at the University of Houston.

The internship did not offer health insurance but UH hosts free mammography screenings in October in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month. However, when she told the nurses about her lump, they assured her, with a cursory glance, that she was too young to worry about cancer. She was sent away without a mammogram.

Reassured and a little abashed about being paranoid,

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Black Women Battling Breast Cancer Deserve More Wig Options, According to Coils to Locs Founder Dianne Austin

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When Dianne Austin decided to ditch her relaxer and transition back to her natural hair in 2011, she had no idea that four years later she would be hit with the heartbreaking news of a breast cancer diagnosis.

“My first thoughts were how ironic it was that I went down this path of embracing my natural hair just to lose every strand of it,” she shares with InStyle. “It was a huge decision for me to stop relaxing my hair and to begin to embrace my natural texture after years of relaxing.”

As she began to say goodbye to her own hair, Austin, like many in cancer treatment, was in search of a wig. And while they’re sometimes covered, depending on the healthcare insurance provider, she wasn’t able to find any that even came close to matching her natural coily texture.

That’s why in 2019, she created Coils to

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Mary J. Blige on barriers Black women face in breast cancer awareness

Nine-time Grammy winner Mary J. Blige is using her powerful voice to bring attention to the barriers Black women face when it comes to breast cancer screenings — according to the CDC, breast cancer has a 40% higher mortality rate among Black women than White women.. 

Teaming up with the Black Women’s Health Imperative, Blige took part in a PSA where she recounted her own personal experience with breast cancer in an effort to try and inspire Black women to be proactive when it comes to their health.

“I lost my aunt to breast cancer. And that has crossed my mind a bit when I’ve gone in for my annual appointments,” she says in the video. “However, I haven’t let that stop me from being sure about my health and I don’t think anyone else should either. Black women are often very private. We don’t want people knowing our business.

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Wedding Photo of Bridesmaid Wearing Breast Pump

Parents who commit to exclusively pumping know that sticking to a schedule is everything. So when Allison Hepler agreed to be in her best friend Rachael Downs’s wedding on Oct. 25, 2019, she had her pumping sessions planned down to the second. But of course, plans often go awry — especially during weddings — so when Allison was asked if she’d be comfortable posing for a photo with her breast pump in tow, she didn’t flinch. Thankfully, photographer Amber Fletcher captured the perfect shot, and it pays homage to parents everywhere.

“Rachael has always been supportive and knew exactly what I needed as she had already been down that road,” Allison told POPSUGAR. “So I was pumping four times a day at the time of her wedding. One was while we were getting ready and the other was right before the ceremony. I was trying to squeeze in a session

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Why Black women face disproportionate rates of breast cancer

This story originally ran on Today.com.

The day before she turned 30 and had planned to leave for a celebratory vacation, Sharonda Vincent felt a lump on her left breast while in the shower. She scheduled a last-minute appointment with a doctor at Planned Parenthood, who told her to enjoy her trip because she doubted it was cancerous.

After Vincent returned home to Philadelphia, the mother of one decided to see her primary care provider, just in case. This led to a series of tests, including a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy. In the summer of 2005, she was diagnosed with stage 2B breast cancer.

“I was numb, hurt, confused, upset, questioning God,” she told TODAY. “It was a complete shock.”

Vincent, now 45, has been cancer-free for 15 years, thanks to the surgery, chemo and radiation she underwent that summer. She’s among the millions of Black women who’ve survived breast

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Why Black women face high rates of breast cancer

This story originally ran on Today.com.

The day before she turned 30 and had planned to leave for a celebratory vacation, Sharonda Vincent felt a lump on her left breast while in the shower. She scheduled a last-minute appointment with a doctor at Planned Parenthood, who told her to enjoy her trip because she doubted it was cancerous.

After Vincent returned home to Philadelphia, the mother of one decided to see her primary care provider, just in case. This led to a series of tests, including a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy. In the summer of 2005, she was diagnosed with stage 2B breast cancer.

“I was numb, hurt, confused, upset, questioning God,” she told TODAY. “It was a complete shock.”

Vincent, now 45, has been cancer-free for 15 years, thanks to the surgery, chemo and radiation she underwent that summer. She’s among the millions of Black women who’ve survived breast

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Houston nonprofit The Rose determined to help uninsured women receive breast cancer treatment

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted millions of lives in many ways, one of which is the severe cut back in the number people keeping up with their routine checkups. Houston-based nonprofit group The Rose, which has been helping women receive breast cancer diagnoses and treatments for over 35 years regardless of their ability to pay, is determined not to give up on its mission.

Dorothy Gibbons, CEO and co-founder of The Rose, said the marked increase in the number of people putting off their mammograms was disastrous since early detection was the key to stopping cancer in most cases.

“We are conducting our screenings while observing social distancing,” said Gibbons. “We’re at 75 percent of what we normally would be doing. Some of our ladies are having to wait a bit to get their mammogram.”

The Rose operates two clinics in Houston and Bellaire respectively where women, insured or uninsured,

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Black women speak out about breast cancer risk

The day before she turned 30 and had planned to leave for a celebratory vacation, Sharonda Vincent felt a lump on her left breast while in the shower. She scheduled a last-minute appointment with a doctor at Planned Parenthood, who told her to enjoy her trip because she doubted it was cancerous.

After Vincent returned home to Philadelphia, the mother of one decided to see her primary care provider, just in case. This led to a series of tests, including a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy. In the summer of 2005, she was diagnosed with stage 2B breast cancer.

“I was numb, hurt, confused, upset, questioning God,” she told TODAY. “It was a complete shock.”

Vincent, now 45, has been cancer-free for 15 years, thanks to the surgery, chemo and radiation she underwent that summer. She’s among the millions of Black women who’ve survived breast cancer, even though the odds are

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12 Beauty Products to Shop During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

InStyle/Courtesy, Getty Images

October marks that time of year where our beauty counters get a little more pink for a great cause: Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

While many people don’t need an excuse to stock up on their cult-favorite creams or lipstick, there is nothing more motivating than giving back. That’s why each year, makeup, hair, and skincare brands alike all partner with various charities and initiatives to raise awareness and fund research to one day find a cure for breast cancer.

So if you’re in the mood to do a little shopping in October, we’re sharing all our favorite beauty buys for the month with you. Each product is sure to deliver quality results, with profits going to an important cause.

RELATED: What It’s Like to Battle Breast Cancer in the Middle of a Pandemic

Glamglow Bubblesheet Oxygenating Deep Cleanse Mask

To shop: $9; glamglow.com

Planning your next at-home

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The Best Beauty Products That Give Back to Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Fall colors are typically rich shades of oranges, reds and yellows, but October is all about pink. The official hue of Breast Cancer Awareness Month covers practically every product you can think of to raise awareness and funding for the disease. Whether or not you’ve been touched by breast cancer, it’s easy to give your support by thinking pink. These are the best beauty products that give back to BCA, so they’ll help you look good while doing good.

 

1. ghd Gold Hair Styler in Powder Pink

Many women spend plenty of time on their skin-care regimen as part of their self-care routine, but what about a self-breast exam? That’s the idea behind ghd’s “Take Control Now” campaign, which encourages women to do them regularly. The brand’s 16th year supporting BCA is dedicated to early detection. For every purchase from the limited-edition Pink Collection, $10 will be donated to the

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