Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearings divide Catholic women

“I seriously so admire her story” she texted her friend, a fellow Catholic woman, as she watched the Supreme Court nominee’s confirmation hearings this week.

Still, Lynch was bothered by the way the judge’s story was being used by politicians. She felt President Trump was exploiting the nomination to try to win over Catholic suburban women like her, she said. And she was frustrated that senators continued to bring up Barrett’s large family.

“You just know that if it was a father of 7 up for nomination,” Lynch texted her friend, “they wouldn’t be doing that.”

As Catholic women watched the first two days of Barrett’s confirmation process in the Senate, some saw her as a new kind of “feminist icon,” a woman who raised seven children while pursuing a successful career and prioritizing her faith. Others saw an unrealistic model of what Catholic women are expected to be.

“She’s

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Amy Coney Barrett criticized for dress she wore to hearing

“Women lawyers & judges wear suits, including dresses with jackets, for work,” D.C.-based attorney Leslie McAdoo Gordon wrote. “It is not a great look that ACB consistently does not. No male judge would be dressed in less than correct courtroom attire. It’s inappropriately casual.”

Female attorneys and judges swiftly pushed back to express frustration that discussion of a woman in public life had turned once again to her clothing.

“Basically every professional woman I know (including myself) has serious anxiety about what they wear to work,” tweeted Carissa Byrne Hessick, a criminal law professor at the University of North Carolina. “Crappy takes like this one are a big reason why.”

“Who cares what she wears?” wrote Mary Ziegler, a law professor at Florida State University. “If she wore a Halloween costume, or walked in naked, this would not change: Amy Coney Barrett is very accomplished. … If you

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Women’s and Civil Rights Groups Hold March in Protest of Amy Coney Barrett Hearing

For the second straight day, Senate proceedings for Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court will be met with protests and demonstrations.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Protesters dress in costumes from "The Handmaids Tale" attempt to move after being surrounded by supporters of Judge Amy Coney Barrett outside of the Supreme Court the morning that the confirmation hearings begin for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to become an Associate Justice on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away in September.


© Samuel Corum/Getty
Protesters dress in costumes from “The Handmaids Tale” attempt to move after being surrounded by supporters of Judge Amy Coney Barrett outside of the Supreme Court the morning that the confirmation hearings begin for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to become an Associate Justice on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away in September.

A coalition of women’s and civil rights groups marched on Tuesday in protest of what they described as “rushed hearing” to consider the judge’s appointment to fill the seat vacated by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Participating organizations included the National Women’s Law Center, Alliance for Justice, The Leadership Conference

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Women in ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ habits protest ahead of Barrett confirmation hearings

Demonstrators attired in “Handmaid’s Tale” garbs on Monday gathered outside the U.S. Supreme Court to voice their opposition to the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett.



a group of people wearing costumes: Women in 'Handmaid's Tale' habits protest ahead of Barrett confirmation hearings


© The Hill
Women in ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ habits protest ahead of Barrett confirmation hearings

The striking red robes reference the clothing women are forced to wear in the fictional novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood in which an extremist Christian sect overthrows the U.S. government and strips women of nearly all their rights.

The outfit was similarly worn by demonstrators who protested during the confirmation hearings of Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Those who oppose the nomination of Barrett fear that she will support the reversal of the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that made abortion legal nationwide. Barrett has been critical of the ruling in the past. Many have also expressed concern that Barrett will work to take down the Affordable Care Act,

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Senators have an opportunity to model religious tolerance in the Amy Coney Barrett hearings. Will they?

I’ve never met Amy Coney Barrett, and I’m not a legal scholar with informed opinions on her past judicial rulings. But I find myself sympathizing with her as she prepares to enter the lion’s den of Supreme Court confirmation hearings.

Because like Barrett, but on a smaller stage, I know what it’s like to juggle a high-profile career, in a flyover state, while raising small children and practicing my faith, a kind of faith that many of my colleagues thought disqualified me from doing good work.

When I read that at a 2017 court of appeals confirmation hearing, Sen. Dianne Feinstein told Judge Barrett, “the dogma lives loudly within you” — implying that the judge would impose her conservative Catholic faith on Americans — I flashed back to a standoff with colleagues early in my broadcast journalism career.

It was shortly after I’d been assigned to the religion and culture

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Amy Coney Barrett: A Role Model for Mothers and Young Women

Judge Amy Coney Barrett meets with Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R., W. Va.) on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., September 30, 2020. (Sarah Silbiger/Reuters)

As some of us have already noted elsewhere on NRO, if confirmed, Judge Amy Coney Barrett would be the only mother sitting on the Supreme Court, and she’d be the first mother of school-aged children ever to do so. To most people inclined to view her nomination without the cynicism induced by despising either Trump or constitutional originalism (or both), that’s a pretty remarkable fact.

For American mothers, as well as for young women, Barrett is the sort of role model one doesn’t often come across in politics. As I pointed out in a piece here at NRO last week, her life and her success puts the lie to modern feminism’s false, harmful notion of freedom. And in my latest piece over at the Catholic Herald

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Rep. Debbie Lesko: Want more women on Supreme Court? Include conservatives like Amy Coney Barrett

When asked when there would be enough women on the Supreme Court, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once famously said: “When there are nine.” In the wake of her passing, this quote has been shared on social media and referenced by the news media.

In many ways, Ginsburg’s comment has become the rallying cry of feminists across our country, advocating for women in leadership in the highest positions in our nation. But now, when faced with the prospect that some of those nine justices could be — and should be — conservative, the women of the liberal left are no longer interested in the prospect of another woman on the court.

Known for her contributions to women’s rights throughout her career, Ginsburg has inspired a generation of women in the legal profession.

BARRETT SAYS TRUMP OFFERED HER SUPREME COURT NOMINATION 3 DAYS AFTER RUTH BADER GINSBURG’S DEATH

From her early days

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What women in Congress say about Amy Coney Barrett



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People of Praise, tied to Amy Barrett, knocked for treatment of women

CLOSE

Amy Coney Barrett, a Catholic, law professor and Court of Appeals judge, is President Donald Trump’s pick for his third Supreme Court nomination.

Wochit

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court has close ties to a charismatic Christian religious group that holds men are divinely ordained as the “head” of the family and faith. Former members of the group, called People of Praise, say it teaches that wives must submit to the will of their husbands. 

Federal appeals judge Amy Coney Barrett has not commented publicly about her own or her family’s involvement, and a People of Praise spokesman declined to say whether she and her husband are current members. 

But Barrett, 48, grew up in New Orleans in a family deeply connected to the organization and as recently as 2017 she served as a trustee at the People of Praise-affiliated Trinity Schools Inc.,

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Amy Coney Barrett nomination is a victory for conservative women


There is a strong pressure for conservative women to self-censor our views, lest we be mocked or stereotyped. But we have to be ready to fight back.

Karin A. Lips
 |  Opinion contributor

After interning in the summer of 2004 for my home state senator in Washington, D.C., I returned to the University of Virginia looking for a group of women who wanted to talk about the issues of the day and welcomed a more conservative perspective. There was a women’s club, a Women’s Studies department, and even a Women’s Center at UVA. But, because I am a conservative woman, my ideas were not fully welcome at the traditional women’s institutions on campus.

I started the Network of enlightened Women, known as NeW, that fall as an intellectual home for conservative women on campus. At the time, modern feminists routinely questioned and dismissed my views. Sixteen years later, the problem

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