Senator Shares Story Of Wife’s Abortion To Underline Stakes Of Supreme Court Nomination For Women’s Health

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Sen. Gary Peters (D-Mich.) shared in an Elle interview Monday that his wife had an abortion in the late 1980s after doctors warned she was at risk of losing her uterus and possibly dying, saying he came forward because of what is at stake with the Supreme Court nomination of Amy Coney Barrett.

Key Facts

Heidi Peters was four months pregnant when her water broke, leaving the fetus without the amniotic fluid necessary to survive, and a doctor told the couple to go home to wait for her to miscarry.

It didn’t happen and when they went to the hospital the next day, the doctor recommended an abortion because the fetus would not be able to survive, despite having a faint heartbeat, however they were unable to have the procedure at the hospital because it was banned

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Supreme Court says women can get abortion pill by mail, for now

ASSOCIATED PRESS



a large building: Justices continue arguments in a new term without their colleague, the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.


© Associated Press
Justices continue arguments in a new term without their colleague, the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The Supreme Court on Thursday said it would for now continue to allow women to obtain an abortion pill by mail during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The action came over the dissent of two conservative justices who would have immediately granted a Trump administration request to reinstate the requirement that women must visit a hospital, clinic or medical office to obtain a pill.

Video: Supreme Court blocks federal enforcement of restrictions for women seeking abortion drug during pandemic (FOX News)

Supreme Court blocks federal enforcement of restrictions for women seeking abortion drug during pandemic

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The court did little more than defer its first action on an abortion-related issue since the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month. The court called for a lower-court judge

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doctor visits not needed for abortion pill in pandemic

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The FDA won’t allow you to get the abortion pill from a pharmacy with a prescription. The coronavirus pandemic has made it even harder to access.

USA TODAY

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court ruled on a temporary basis Thursday night that women seeking to end their pregnancies with medication do not need to visit a health care provider, given the COVID-19 pandemic.

The action was a setback for the Trump administration, which had sought to reinstate a 20-year-old policy following lower court rejections. The justices ordered the government to make its case in more detail before a federal trial court, a process that could take six weeks and extend beyond Election Day. 

The court gave little reason for its action other than a desire to develop “a more comprehensive record.” But it hinted that during the review process, “relevant circumstances” could change. That could mean an easing of COVID-19

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Justices Say Women Can Get Abortion Pill by Mail, for Now | Health News

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday said it would for now continue to allow women to obtain an abortion pill by mail during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The action came over the dissent of two conservative justices who would have immediately granted a Trump administration request to reinstate the requirement that women must visit a hospital, clinic or medical office to obtain a pill.

The court did little more than defer its first action on an abortion-related issue since the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month. The court called for a lower-court judge to take a new look at the issue and rule within 40 days. That would put any further high court action after the Nov. 3 election.

The court said in an unsigned opinion that it was holding the administration’s appeal “in abeyance.”

The administration is asking to be allowed to enforce a U.S. Food

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Women demanding legal abortion clash with police in Mexico

By Carlos Jasso and Laura Gottesdiener | Reuters

MEXICO CITY – Women charged police lines and threw Molotov cocktails at officers in Mexico City on Monday during protests demanding the legalization of abortion in the majority Roman Catholic country.

The protesters, clad in the green bandanas that have become the symbol of the pro-choice movement in Latin America, gathered in Mexico’s capital to mark International Safe Abortion Day, which is celebrated each year on Sept. 28.

Police, many of them female officers, responded by spraying plumes of tear gas at the women, some of whom wielded hammers, and threw bottles and paint.

At least one officer was briefly engulfed in flames after being hit by a Molotov cocktail, before colleagues doused the fire with an extinguisher, television images showed.

Abortion is illegal in Mexico outside the capital city and the southern state of Oaxaca, which legalized the medical procedure last

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Mexican women demanding legalization of abortion clash with police

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Women charged police lines and threw Molotov cocktails at officers in Mexico City on Monday during protests demanding the legalization of abortion in the majority Roman Catholic country.

The protesters, clad in the green bandanas that have become the symbol of the pro-choice movement in Latin America, gathered in Mexico’s capital to mark International Safe Abortion Day, which is celebrated each year on Sept. 28.

Police, many of them female officers, responded by spraying plumes of tear gas at the women, some of whom wielded hammers, and threw bottles and paint.

At least one officer was briefly engulfed in flames after being hit by a Molotov cocktail, before colleagues doused the fire with an extinguisher, television images showed.

Abortion is illegal in Mexico outside the capital city and the southern state of Oaxaca, which legalized the medical procedure last year. In the rest of Mexico, abortion

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