Afghan negotiator: Nobel nomination nod to women’s campaign

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) – Afghan peace negotiator Fawzia Koofi is one of four women representing the Afghan government who have been sitting down at the negotiating table with members of the Taliban for talks that began last month in the Arab state of Qatar.

She was also one of 318 candidates – 211 individuals and 107 organizations – nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize this year, a nomination that Koofi said gave a boost to Afghan women seeking to claim their rightful role in shaping a peaceful future for Afghanistan.

The prestigious award on Friday went to the World Food Program for its efforts to combat hunger in regions facing conflict and hardship at a time when the coronavirus pandemic has driven millions more people to the brink of starvation.

Koofi, a 45-year-old women’s and human rights activist, former member of parliament and survivor of two armed attacks, said the

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Nobel Prizes 2020: Women honored but the awards still aren’t diverse

Of 931 individuals and 28 organizations to have won the prize since the awards began, just 16 are Black. No Black winners were named in 2020.
Twelve Black people have won the Peace Prize, three the Nobel Prize in Literature, and one the associated Prize in Economics awarded by Sweden’s central bank in Alfred Nobel’s honor. No Black recipients have ever won one of the science prizes.
On Monday, the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to Harvey J. Alter, Michael Houghton and Charles M. Rice for the discovery of hepatitis C virus, which led to the development of tests and treatments.
Tuesday’s Physics prize went to Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel and Andrea Ghez for their discoveries about black holes. Ghez became only the fourth woman to win a Nobel physics prize.
Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna on Wednesday became the first two female scientists to jointly win the
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Nobel Prize Winners In Chemistry And Physics Discuss Shattering Gender Norm, Redefining Women’s Roles

The first Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded 119 years ago, and on Wednesday for the first time in its history, two women won without having to share the prize with a man. Their groundbreaking development may shift the perception of women in scientific roles, and continue to disrupt the centuries-old mindset that women are second to men in innovation or in any field. 

Dr. Jennifer Doudna, a biochemist at UC Berkeley and French researcher Dr. Emmanuelle Charpentier of the Max Planch Institute accepted the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the CRISPR-Cas9 genetic scissors, a

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Meet the Women Who Won Nobel Prizes This Year

Photo credit: Getty Images + Shutterstock - Getty Images
Photo credit: Getty Images + Shutterstock – Getty Images

From Harper’s BAZAAR

Since the Nobel Prize was established in 1895, less than 60 women have been honored with the prestigious international award. This week, four women–Louise Glück, Emmanuelle Charpentier, Jennifer A. Doudna, and Andrea M. Ghez–were added to that roster, triumphing in literature, chemistry, and physics.

Below, meet the women became Nobel laureates in 2020.

Louise Glück

Photo credit: Robin Marchant - Getty Images
Photo credit: Robin Marchant – Getty Images

American poet Louise Glück was honored with the Nobel Prize in literature for “for her unmistakable poetic voice that with austere beauty makes individual existence universal.”

The New York-born writer, who is now a professor of English at Yale University, is no stranger to prestigious awards, having previously won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for The Wild Iris and the 2014 National Book Award for Faithful and Virtuous Night. She was also previously named the United

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Nobel nomination nod to women’s campaign

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghan peace negotiator Fawzia Koofi is one of four women representing the Afghan government who have been sitting down at the negotiating table with members of the Taliban for talks that began last month in the Arab state of Qatar.

She was also one of 318 candidates — 211 individuals and 107 organizations — nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize this year, a nomination that Koofi said gave a boost to Afghan women seeking to claim their rightful role in shaping a peaceful future for Afghanistan.

The prestigious award on Friday went to the World Food Program for its efforts to combat hunger in regions facing conflict and hardship at a time when the coronavirus pandemic has driven millions more people to the brink of starvation.

Koofi, a 45-year-old women’s and human rights activist, former member of parliament and survivor of two armed attacks, said the

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Two women share chemistry Nobel in historic win for ‘genetic scissors’

Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and Jennifer DoudnaImage copyright
Getty Images

Image caption

Emmanuelle Charpentier (L) and Jennifer Doudna began a formidable partnership in 2011

Two scientists have been awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing the tools to edit DNA.

Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna are the first two women to share the prize, which honours their work on the technology of genome editing.

Their discovery, known as Crispr-Cas9 “genetic scissors”, is a way of making specific and precise changes to the DNA contained in living cells.

They will split the prize money of 10 million krona (£861,200; $1,110,400).

Biological chemist Pernilla Wittung-Stafshede, commented: “The ability to cut DNA where you want has revolutionised the life sciences.”

Not only has the women’s technology been transformative for basic research, it could also be used to treat inherited illnesses.

Prof Charpentier, from the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin, said it was

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2 women win Nobel Prize in chemistry for gene-editing method

The scientists’ work allows for laser-sharp snips in long strings of DNA, permitting researchers to precisely edit specific genes to remove errors that lead to disease.

“There is enormous power in this genetic tool, which affects us all,” said Claes Gustafsson, chair of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry. “It has not only revolutionized basic science, but also resulted in innovative crops and will lead to groundbreaking new medical treatments.”

“My greatest hope is that it’s used for good, to uncover new mysteries in biology, and to benefit humankind,” said Doudna, who is age 56 and works at the University of California at Berkeley.

But many have cautioned that the technology must be used carefully. In 2018, Chinese scientist He Jiankui revealed he had helped make the world’s first gene-edited babies, to try to engineer resistance to future infection with the AIDS virus. His work was publicly condemned as unsafe human

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2 women earn Chemistry Nobel Prize for gene-editing tool CRISPR

The 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry went to two women who developed a gene-editing tool called CRISPR-Cas9, which snips DNA like a pair of molecular scissors. 



a close up of a flower: illustration of crispr-cas9 snipping a bit of DNA from a strand


© Provided by Live Science
illustration of crispr-cas9 snipping a bit of DNA from a strand

The technique “has not only revolutionized basic science, but also resulted in innovative crops and will lead to ground-breaking new medical treatments,” Claes Gustafsson, chair of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry, said in a statement. With the ability to deftly slice specific DNA sequences from the genome, scientists can pinpoint the functions of genes; these discoveries both add to our basic understanding of how those genes work and can have practical applications, such as for growing drought- and pest-resistant crops and developing therapies for cancer and genetic disorders. The genetic cut-and-paste system is also being used in new COVID-19 diagnostic tests.

The Nobel “for the development of a

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Nobel winning women hope to inspire a new generation of scientists

On hearing that they had been awarded a Nobel Chemistry Prize for their groundbreaking work on gene-editing Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier said they hoped it would inspire a new generation of women in science.  

Charpentier and Doudna are the first all-woman team to receive a Nobel science prize and become the sixth and seventh women to be honoured for their research in chemistry since the first awards in 1901. 

Pernilla Wittung Stafsheden of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which is responsible for selecting the Nobel laureates in chemistry, said the prize to two female laureates was “a historic moment”. 

The Nobel is for the pair’s development of CRISPR-Cas9, a tool that allows scientists to snip DNA and edit the genetic code of animals, plants and microorganisms.

The scientists said they hoped that the Nobel recognition would also help light up a path for young women entering a field

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