Worcester Public Schools plan to transition to hybrid model next month, but most students expected to return to classrooms in third quarter

The Worcester Public Schools has released an outline of its plan to transition into a hybrid learning model next month, though most students are not slated to return to classrooms until next year.

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, all Worcester students are currently learning remotely as New England’s second-largest city works to combat the spread of the virus and as HVAC upgrades are needed in school buildings. When the second term of the school year starts Nov. 16, students who need the most assistance are slated to start returning to school buildings during the week.

However, thousands of students are not expected to return until next year, during the third quarter of the school year, according to the district’s transition plan.

The transition plan notes that start dates could be affected by coronavirus in the community, any changes in state guidance and the readiness of school buildings. The city is working

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865,000 women left the workforce last month

This story was published in partnership with The 19th, a nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom reporting on gender, politics and policy.

The nation’s first female recession deepened in September: More women left the labor force than the total number of jobs the country added last month. 

About 865,000 women dropped out of the workforce, compared to 216,000 men. Overall, the United States job market added 661,000 jobs between August and September, according to the latest jobs report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics Friday. 

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The figure captures the enduring challenges faced by women who make up the majority of the workforce in fields that have been hardest hit by social distancing and COVID-19 – particularly retail and hospitality – and the ongoing dissolution of the child care industry that has left many working mothers without

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About 4 times as many women than men reported they were unemployed last month



a man standing in front of a brick building: Pekic/Getty Images


© Pekic/Getty Images
Pekic/Getty Images

  • Four times as many women than men have left the workforce in September, according to a new report from The 19th, a nonprofit newsroom covering gender and politics. 
  • About 865,000 women in the country reported in September that they were no longer employed, compared to 216,000 men, the report said. 
  • The massive discrepancy between the number of men and women who left the workforce illustrates how women are largely struggling to stay afloat as the coronavirus pandemic continues.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Four times as many women than men have left the workforce in September, according to a new report.

About 865,000 women in the country reported in September that they were no longer employed, compared to 216,000 men, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data reported by The 19th, a nonprofit news organization focusing on gender and politics.

The US Bureau

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Bill Burr’s ‘SNL’ Monologue Criticized for Jokes on White Women, Cancel Culture, and Pride Month

Bill Burr is no stranger to challenging woke culture and the accepted way of thinking. Yet, when he brought this unorthodox way of critiquing society to the bright lights of Saturday Night Live, some viewers were outraged by his comments.

Burr’s opening monologue had no shortage of jokes geared towards hot button issues. He attacked those who opposed coronavirus regulations and cancel culture, but it was his jokes about the appropriation of oppression that caught people off guard. Burr stated that woke culture was created for people of color but has been hijacked by white women who were looking to distance themselves from their hand in establishing racism. 

Burr also questioned why the LGBTQ+ community is awarded the entire month of June while Black people are forced to cram their celebrations into a 28-day month. Instead, Burr proposed that Black History month be moved to July because the weather

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865,000 women were laid off last month amid COVID-19 pandemic

Chabeli Carrazana, The 19th
Published 7:00 a.m. ET Oct. 11, 2020

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This story was published in partnership with The 19th, a nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom reporting on gender, politics and policy.

The nation’s first female recession deepened in September: More women left the labor force than the total number of jobs the country added last month. 

About 865,000 women dropped out of the workforce, compared to 216,000 men. Overall, the United States job market added 661,000 jobs between August and September, according to the latest jobs report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics Friday. 

A caravan protest on unemployment benefits in New Orleans on July 22, 2020. (Photo: Max Becherer/The Advocate via AP)

The figure captures the enduring challenges faced by women who make up the majority of the workforce in fields that have been hardest hit by social distancing and the coronavirus — particularly retail and hospitality —

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Tesla’s Model 3 Lost In The World’s Most Advanced EV Market In A Peak Month (NASDAQ:TSLA)

Introduction

Norway is a small automotive market but is widely regarded as the most advanced market for electric vehicles (EVs) in the world thanks to generous government incentives. Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and hybrids accounted for over 80% of sales in September 2020 and the national parliament has set 2025 as the target year for the country to go fully electric.

This is why electric vehicle data from Norway if often used as an indicator for the prediction which models and manufacturers will excel in a world in which electric vehicles become the norm. There is also no local player, which means the Norwegian EV market is not skewed like some other countries like France where the Renault Zoe reigns supreme.

As I mentioned in my previous SA article on Tesla (TSLA), its Model 3 always performs poorly in Europe during the first month

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12 Beauty Products to Shop During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

InStyle/Courtesy, Getty Images

October marks that time of year where our beauty counters get a little more pink for a great cause: Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

While many people don’t need an excuse to stock up on their cult-favorite creams or lipstick, there is nothing more motivating than giving back. That’s why each year, makeup, hair, and skincare brands alike all partner with various charities and initiatives to raise awareness and fund research to one day find a cure for breast cancer.

So if you’re in the mood to do a little shopping in October, we’re sharing all our favorite beauty buys for the month with you. Each product is sure to deliver quality results, with profits going to an important cause.

RELATED: What It’s Like to Battle Breast Cancer in the Middle of a Pandemic

Glamglow Bubblesheet Oxygenating Deep Cleanse Mask

To shop: $9; glamglow.com

Planning your next at-home

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Female Retail Brand Founders & National Women’s Small Business Month

October is National Women’s Small Business Month, an initiative focused on promoting female-led business operations.

In 2020, this month-long spotlight on female business owners is especially important, as recent reports show the impact of the pandemic has been dramatic on women in the workforce: Many aged 25 to 54 have stepped out of the professional environment to care for children and family. 

Despite this year’s challenges, the 2019 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report indicated upward growth in the world of female-helmed businesses. 

Findings from the research indicate there are nearly 13 million women-owned businesses in the US that employ 9.4 million people and generate $1.9 trillion in sales. 

Additionally, women-owned businesses grew 21% between 2014 to 2019, while businesses owned by women of color doubled that growth rate: As of 2019, women of color accounted for 50% of all women who owned businesses.

Within the retail and direct-to-consumer sector,

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Black History Month: Images of strength and beauty

By Rebecca Thomas
Arts and entertainment reporter

Julio Etchart - Carnival

image copyrightJulio Etchart

image captionJulio Etchart reminds us of the joy of the Notting Hill Carnival, which was cancelled this year due to the pandemic

An eclectic collection of images of black people from all sectors of British life have been selected for an exhibition marking the importance of Black History Month in Britain this October.

The online show features 50 striking pictures on a wide range of themes with portraits, demonstrations, women at work, carnival, musicians, dancers and more featured.

More than 100 images were submitted to the show’s organisers Alternative Arts, working with Tower Hamlets Council in East London, from established and emerging artists.

The final selection aims to comment on black lives past and present and the issues that confront them.

And while Black History Month is a long-running annual event, this

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UMass model projects state coronavirus death tally will rise to nearly 10,000 by end of month

A University of Massachusetts model predicts the state’s coronavirus death toll could rise to nearly 10,000 by Oct. 31.

The model says the state’s tally could stand at 9,967 coronavirus deaths by that time, though researchers noted the numbers could range between 9,792 and 10,262.

The model numbers reflect both confirmed and probable cases. The state had tallied 9,530 confirmed and probable case deaths as of Monday.

The rate of deaths reported each day has declined after a terrifying climb this spring, but the heartbreaking numbers have not gone to zero. The modelers say weekly deaths could range from 70 to 190 in the next four weeks.

Last week’s model had projected a slight decline in confirmed and probable coronavirus cases in coming weeks. This week’s model, however, notes a sharp increase in cases in the week ending Saturday, and it predicts the case numbers will generally stabilize at that

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