Women’s and Civil Rights Groups Hold March in Protest of Amy Coney Barrett Hearing

For the second straight day, Senate proceedings for Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court will be met with protests and demonstrations.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Protesters dress in costumes from "The Handmaids Tale" attempt to move after being surrounded by supporters of Judge Amy Coney Barrett outside of the Supreme Court the morning that the confirmation hearings begin for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to become an Associate Justice on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away in September.


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Protesters dress in costumes from “The Handmaids Tale” attempt to move after being surrounded by supporters of Judge Amy Coney Barrett outside of the Supreme Court the morning that the confirmation hearings begin for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to become an Associate Justice on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away in September.

A coalition of women’s and civil rights groups marched on Tuesday in protest of what they described as “rushed hearing” to consider the judge’s appointment to fill the seat vacated by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Participating organizations included the National Women’s Law Center, Alliance for Justice, The Leadership Conference

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Kalamazoo women’s march planned in memory of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

KALAMAZOO, MI — Kalamazoo is joining a national organization, The Women’s March, in honoring the life and legacy of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.



a young child holding a sign: Eleanor Lownds, 7, poses with her sign in Bronson Park before participating in the women's march in downtown Kalamazoo, Michigan on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020. This was Eleanor's third women's march.


© Kendall Warner/Kendall Warner | MLive.com/mlive.com/TNS
Eleanor Lownds, 7, poses with her sign in Bronson Park before participating in the women’s march in downtown Kalamazoo, Michigan on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020. This was Eleanor’s third women’s march.

The march is planned to start at 11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 17, in Bronson Park. The march will circle Bronson Park, heading north on Park Street, then turning east on Michigan Avenue, then south on Rose Street, and turning west on South Street. The march through downtown Kalamazoo is estimated to last 35-40 minutes.



a group of people sitting on a couch: A marcher wears a backpack covered in buttons before the women's march in Bronson Park in downtown Kalamazoo, Michigan on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020.


© Kendall Warner/Kendall Warner | MLive.com/mlive.com/TNS
A marcher wears a backpack covered in buttons before the women’s march in Bronson Park in downtown Kalamazoo, Michigan on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2020.

After the

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Everything You Need To Know About The October 17 Women’s March

It was an unforgettable sight: 200,000 people of all ages, backgrounds, and genders decked out in pink and proudly carrying “I’m With Her” and “My Body, My Choice” signs above head as they marched down the National Mall in the nation’s capital. Similar scenes were unfolding in cities small and large all across the United States and indeed the world, and an estimated five million women, men, and children took to the streets to protest the inauguration of Donald Trump, making the Women’s March the largest single-day protest in U.S. history. Now, nearly four years later, the Women’s March is back to once again fight for reproductive rights, immigration reform, LGBTQ+ rights, racial equality, healthcare reform, and the environment, among seemingly countless other women’s and human rights issues.

Although Women’s March has been held annually in the years since President Trump took office, it

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Women’s March Supreme Court Amy Coney Barrett

Last week, the Women’s March organization said it is planning a “socially distant march” in Washington and more than 30 other cities on Oct. 17, days before Senate Republicans aim to vote on Trump’s pick to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. Trump has nominated Amy Coney Barrett, a circuit judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, whose writings have led conservatives and liberals to believe she would be willing to vote to overturn Roe v. Wade. She has also been critical of a 2012 Supreme Court decision that upheld the Affordable Care Act.

The goal, the Women’s March group says, is to “send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat.”

The organization plans to organize a rally in Freedom Plaza, followed by a march to the Supreme

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