New film ‘Bottega Veneta: Men’ examines identity and clothes.

“You can be whatever you want, can’t you?” asks English artist Dick Jewell at the open of Bottega Veneta: Men, the short film from Daniel Lee, creative director of the Italian fashion house, and filmmaker Tyrone Lebon. That question, along with others, centers the project’s exploration of what exact qualities make a man.

Men is Lee’s first film since joining Bottega Veneta in 2018, and features Jewell alongside London musician Obongjayar, English producer and MC Tricky, Swedish singer-songwriter Neneh Cherry, Irish actor Barry Keoghan, Scottish dancer Michael Clark, the mysterious young Roman, English painter George Rouy, and Italian-born Richard Bolle, who is the principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre.

Throughout the film, its subjects confront traditional notions of masculinity, which they present as limiting and even damaging. “In my youth, I’d never seen men make physical contact apart from punching each other,” Clark says wearing an all-black Bottega

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New model examines how societal influences affect U.S. political opinions

people
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Northwestern University researchers have developed the first quantitative model that captures how politicized environments affect U.S. political opinion formation and evolution.


Using the model, the researchers seek to understand how populations change their opinions when exposed to political content, such as news media, campaign ads and ordinary personal exchanges. The math-based framework is flexible, allowing future data to be incorporated as it becomes available.

“It’s really powerful to understand how people are influenced by the content that they see,” said David Sabin-Miller, a Northwestern graduate student who led the study. “It could help us understand how populations become polarized, which would be hugely beneficial.”

“Quantitative models like this allow us to run computational experiments,” added Northwestern’s Daniel Abrams, the study’s senior author. “We could simulate how various interventions might help fix extreme polarization to promote consensus.”

The paper will be published on Thursday (Oct. 1) in

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